Christian Response to Cake for a Gay Marriage

Christian Baker Under Fire for Refusing Wedding Cake for Gay Marriage

A Christian bakery owner is under fire for refusing to make a wedding cake for a homosexual couple participating in openly gay marriage ceremony.  The couple alleges that the bakery owner told them “they were abominations to the Lord”.   Scripture tells us that Jesus was full of both grace and truth. If this statement with the term abomination was used then that wouldn’t have been with grace, however the baker has indicated that he didn’t make such a statement. There are many issues here:

1. For Christians there is no separation of faith and life. We are not to have a public business face and private Christian face.
2. Eph 5:11 “Take no part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but instead expose them.”  We are to take no part in deeds contrary to God’s moral standards and purposes.

3. Mt 5:19 says that if we ignore God’s law and teach others that its OK to ignore Gods law we shall be considered least in the kingdom of heaven. We are not to act in such a way that we leave any impression that any part of God’s law is something to be ignored. While everyone coming for cakes has some sin in their life this is a step further because the cake itself would be participating in an act of open rebellion to God’s law and design for marriage and therefore its creator would be doing so as well. Such a participation would constitute an infraction against the commands from God in scripture and here in Mt 5:19.  I have seen this justified by comparing it to a gun shop owner being responsible for the murder committed by a customer who bought a gun.  However just because someone buys a gun doesn’t infer that they are going to commit murder.  It is not the same thing as providing services for an event in direct opposition to God’s word since you know how it will be used beforehand.  Another example would be if I am a contractor and a gentleman’s club wants me to build their stage I would have to refuse; participation in or enablement of behavior contrary to the Word of God is not justifiable.
4. We are to extend grace and avoid enacting a judgement against others. The word judgement has two meanings; it is either a statement indicating a determination regarding correctness or it can mean a prescription of action to be taken, a prescribed penal response. We are to avoid penal responses and we are to avoid coming to our own determinations regarding correctness. But we are not to remain silent about God’s already stated “judgments”, His statements about whether something is right or wrong. Telling someone, making a public statement or taking a public action in line with God’s commands and design is not making a judgement our-self it is informing someone of God’s judgement. It might not be received well as people want to rebel and don’t want to have God’s word point out that they are in opposition to God and that God considers their actions wrong. But it is necessary because Romans 7:9-13 shows us that the law is part of the gospel. The good news is not so good unless we are aware of its contrast with the bad news of our sin.

It is clear from the law in Genesis 2:24 and reiterated by Jesus in Matthew 19:5 that marriage is between a man and a woman.  Further 1 Cor 6:9-11 indicates that those practicing homosexuality will not enter the kingdom of heaven.  I have people in my life that fall into this category and they are people I love very much.  Problem is since the law acknowledges same sex marriage and many in society either are indifferent or now are in support of this those practicing feel as if this “life style” is now legitimate and they will never think twice about it.  This if frustrating because it encourages those I love to continue on a path which puts them at odds with God and His law and under the penalty described in 1 Corinthians 6.

I suppose if it comes down to a judicial ruling or specific legislation compelling Christian’s to render services in support of such an immoral practice, as long as no one is physically in danger, than I believe the moral responsibility would transfer to those forcing compliance. Until such time or circumstance we are compelled to follow God’s principles and policies first.

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About Devin Adint
I have always had many interests; technology, science, philosophy, theology, politics, history, etc... Currently, life for the past twelve years has placed me in the area of technology fulfilling roles in System Administration and Architecture. But I have always been involved in the local church and enjoy researching and discussing issues of theology, philosophy, history and politics...

One Response to Christian Response to Cake for a Gay Marriage

  1. jennacar says:

    Okay, here’s my take on cake: Most weddings in the world (which nobody took account of until the 11th century–to determine who the bastards were (by the church) and the 16th century to determine inheritances (and taxes thereon) by the government. Believers need to adjust their conception of weddings. In Hebrew times, an agreement was made among the families, the ketubah, and a feast was held at the time when the couple were formally united. After the ketubah was signed, the couple were accounted as married, though. (And you might see the Scriptures as a ketubah, with the Bride almost wed to her King, but having run around on him while she waits for him to prepare their future home.)

    Why say all that ancient history? Well, most weddings in the Western world occur on Saturdays–the Sabbath or Friday nights (the Sabbath). (I know you think a sun-worshipping pagan changing that was okay, but it was not. Do your homework.) Working on Saturday is not high on YHWH’s list–in fact, from the first He Himself did not and has not. Yahshua (“Jesus”) spent the Sabbath in the tomb; that’s why he rose shortly thereafter–not because he preferred the first day.

    Believers need to consider–yes–how their faith works in “real life.” They need to determine if their chosen occupation, for instance, is aligned with the Scriptures. If your “job” means you’re working primarily on the Sabbath, then you need to examine that–and inquire of the Throne about whether that’s appropriate. Time is short. You can’t afford to be in error now.

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